Military Science Research

cory.bernhards@biocareers.com

Robert Cory
Bernhards

How to Increase your Chances of Landing a Military Research Job

Finding a good job in today’s economy is a challenge, especially when it comes to specialized research.  

Many PhDs are forced to take jobs they don’t really want, or ones that don’t benefit their career paths.  It doesn’t have to be this way.  Your dream job is out there, and there are things you can do to give yourself a better chance of landing it.


cory.bernhards@biocareers.com

Robert Cory
Bernhards

Postdoc Job Advertising for Military Research Institutes

Ever wonder why you never hear about postdoc job opportunities at military research institutes?  

One reason is that adequate job advertising is severely lacking or completely absent for most military research postdoc positions.  As a result, most prospective postdocs have no idea where to go, or what they need to do to get one of these jobs.  I’ll tell you what you need to know and how to start looking for these positions.


aartituruvekere@biocareers.com

Aarti
Turuvekere

Military Research and Government Research

While completing my masters in public health (MPG) in epidemiology and biostatistics, I was working in clinical research for pharmaceutical companies in HIV and women's health. 

I decided to apply for government contracting/consulting jobs in 2008-09. I leveraged my data analysis skills from my MPH program and landed a job as a public health/business analyst with the Health and Human Services, Indian Health Service (IHS) where I worked with Dr. Theresa Cullen on disease surveillance and population health, and wrote an article which was published with MedInfo Journal. 


jason.sherwin@columbia.edu

Jason
Sherwin

Takeaways from the Organization for Computational Neuroscience’s Annual Meeting

Dispatch from Paris: This week was the annual meeting of the Organization for Computational Neuroscience. This year, it took place at Université Paris Descartes. And so, here we were this week – unraveling the mystery of “cogito ergo sum” (In English: “I think, therefore I am”), or at least displaying our latest attempts at doing so. 


nafisher@loyola.edu

Nathan
Fisher

Creativity versus Stability

That choice wasn't anything that I thought about when leaving academia for government research.  Perhaps because my first government post, with the US Army, actually involved a whole lot of creativity.  Probably even more than I got to use during my dissertation work.


jason.sherwin@columbia.edu

Jason
Sherwin

How do you actually fund the research?

There’s a joke in the research world that you don’t submit a research proposal to NIH until you’ve already done the research. When I was a rookie in the biomedical research world, and I was told this cinema vérité version of things, I thought in typical naïveté, ‘but how do you actually fund the research?’ But, as with all jokes that don’t sink in at first, some experience paved the way for understanding upon a future re-telling. 


jason.sherwin@columbia.edu

Jason
Sherwin

The Hot Word Today

Information seems to be the hot word today. It’s one of those slippery concepts that exists in a somewhat definable way in mathematics and science – particularly in information theory – but it is a hot item with or without a precise way to define it. Just look at finance, media, or a zillion other things hitting your inbox daily. 


jason.sherwin@columbia.edu

Jason
Sherwin

Having a little bit of fun

This posting is about having a little bit of fun – but serious “fun” – in neuroscience. The reason it is fun is because we get to use the pop song “Eye of the Tiger” by Survivor (featured in Rocky III) as a stimulus set for experiments in neuroscience. 


nafisher@loyola.edu

Nathan
Fisher

My Tie is my Combat Patch

I don't particularly like ties in their own right.  They're uncomfortable.  Ties aren't required by my employer and not many of my colleagues wear them regularly.  Still, I wear a tie every day, even on “casual Friday.” 


nafisher@loyola.edu

Nathan
Fisher

Exploit your uniqueness

I'm currently reading It's Called Work for a Reason by Larry Winget.  In this book, Larry says that the secret to success is to “find your uniqueness and figure out how to exploit it in the service of others.”  Do this, he says, and you will be successful.  Do this, I say, and you will love your career.